Two years before the mast - Appendix
Crewlist

Two years before the mast - Appendix

EXTRACTS FROM UNOFFICIAL LOG OF ANDREW B. AMAZEEN ON BOARD THE ALERT ON THE HOME PASSAGE FROM SAN DIEGO, CALIFORNIA, TO BOSTON, MASSACHUSETTS.

.N. B. The nautical day in a ship's log always runs from noon of one day to noon of the next, and is called by the calendar day on which it ends, while the day in Mr. Dana's journal is a land day, running from midnight to midnight. This explains the difference of dates which occasionally appears, as for example, in Mr. Dana's journal they leave San Diego Sunday afternoon, May 8th, while in the log it is on Monday, May 9th.

Monday 9 day of May 1836

Lying at Port Diego--At noon got underway with a fine breeze from the westward in running out the Harbour got on a sand bank Shortly after floated and stood to sea in Comp y with Ship California (p 350 ante) .......... at 5 AM carried away F. Top Mast Studding Sail Boom

Saturday 14 day of May 1836

Fresh Trades and fine weather all drawing sail set

Sundy 3 d day of July 1836

Commences with strong breezes and heavy Squalls of rain and Snow Shortened Sail--Now here comes trouble at 1 P.M. Discovered a great Number of Islands of Ice ahead At 3 do. Counted 18 Islands of Deck--at Sun Set we were completely surrounded this may seem incredible to some persons but it is a positive fact--Midnight Squally Islands of Ice all around Hove to to avoid running into it (p 382 ante)

Mondy 4 th day of July 1836

Islands of Ice all around in sight here We have to Cut and Shear like a struck Dolphin 9-30 P.M. thick Weather and in the midst of danger hove too not being safe to run Midnight Squally 4 Islands of Ice in sight Day light kept away Ice still in sight and very large highest of these Isld of Ice from the water is from 150 to 200 feet and 1/2 mile in length rather more

Tuesdy 5 th day of July

Strong breezes and Squally with Snow and plenty of Ice in Sight 6 P.M. hove too under Close reefd Maintop Sail it not being Safe to run on account of the Ice--Midnight heavy breezes kept away to run clear of an Island of Ice hove too on the other tack .......... ...Several Islads of Ice in sight

Thursdy 7 th day of July 1836

.......... At 1 P.M. Saw Several Large Isld of Ice and Shortly afterwards we were completely surrounded by an innumerable Number of Small ones .......... Midnight heavy gale Cloudy .......... ..Several Islds of Ice in Sight

Friday 8 th day of July 1836

.......... Saw an Isld of Ice on the weather Bow wore Ship and hove too--The Capt. is frightened and in a quandary he says there is no prospects of Making a passage around Cape Horn but that is all nonsense--if he would take courage--make Sail and Crack on when there is a Chance we should soon get out of this--our Situation is dangerous tis true, but I think it better to try to get out of Dangers way than to Stand and let him run over us Morning wore Ship .......... one Island of Ice in sight Just enough to keep the Capt. in the quivers

Saturdy 9 th day of July 1836

Commences fresh breezes and rainy--Ship still Lying too .......... The Capt. thinks it to dangerous to undertake to go round Cape Horn on account the Ice--therefore he has Concluded to go through the Straights of Magellan--he is not acquainted there and it being in the winter the Ship very deep--I think it is jumping out the Frying pan Slap into the Fire (p 394 ante) .......... At 10 A.M. Light breezes from the Sd and Ed kept away made sail for the Straits

Sundy 10 day of July 1836

.......... Employed getting the anchors on the Bows .......... ..Ends light airs and very pleasant I hope the Ice has bid us adieu (p 396 ante)

Monday 11 th day of July 1836

.......... At 3 PM the wind being ahead to proceed for the Straights--the Capt. altered his mind and Bore away for the Cape (397 ante)

Thursdy 14 th day of July 1836

.......... .1 PM Saw a Small Isld of Ice ahead .......... Wore Ship .......... Ship under Short Sail

Sundy 17 day of July 1836

Fine breezes and pleasant weather 2 PM Saw a Large Island if Ice on the lee Bow 2 Smaller ones ahead

Friday 22 day of July 1836

.......... 8 A.M. Clear Weather made Staten Land bearing NW per Compass Dist 35 miles--Passed a large Island of Ice this I hope is the fag End of the Ice--

Satdy 23 day of July 1836

.......... 4 PM Cape St. Johns bore WNW Dist 20 Miles

Thursdy 4 day of August 1836

.......... from 6 to 8 heavy rain attended with Sharp Lightn'g and a Complizant at the Fore Main royal mast heads

Sundy 7 day of August 1836

8 AM spoke the English Barque Mary Catharine from Bahia Bound to Calcutta (p 428 ante)

Mondy 8 day of August 1836

10 AM Passed a Large English Ship Standing to the Sd Ed (p 428 ante)

Friday 12 day of August 1836

....5 A.M. Saw the Island Trinidad bearing per Compass N 1/2 W Dist about 40 miles (p 429 ante)

Tuesday 16 day of August 1836

.......... Midnight Squally Carried away the flying jib-boom (p 440 ante).

Weddy 17 day of August 1836

.......... Midnight Carried away another flying jib-boom It seems that these trades dont approve of a flying jib being Set and I think he is half right--However they are making preparations to give him another--(p 440 ante).

Friday 19 day of August 1836

.......... 3 PM. made the Island Ferdinand Noronha bearing per Comp. s NNW Dist 30 Miles--(p 429 ante)

Satdy 20 day of August . 1836

.......... --27 days from Statten Land--that is going the whole figure--(p 440 ante)

Monday 12 day of Sept . 1836

.......... At 8 A.M. Spoke the Brig Solon from N York bound to Curacoa Supplied us with Some vegetables (p 441-2 ante)

Sunday 18 day of Sept 1836

.......... at 10 Do Struck Soundings in 65 fathoms Muddy Bottom (p 451 ante)

Mondy 19 day of Sept 1836

.......... 4 A.M. 40 fathoms Sandy Bottom (p 451-2 ante)

CREW LISTS AND REGISTERS OF VESSELS

The following lists were copied in 1892 from the United States Custom House records at Boston. These records have since been destroyed.

The "purser's names," that is the names and data on shipping lists, are often inaccurate. Sometimes men enlist under names not their own. If an error once occurs on the official rolls the error is handed down, as the name for each new voyage must correspond with the transfer papers from which it is taken. This may explain, for example, the height of James Hall, put at five feet ten (probably his height when younger). He was about six feet.

The index gives the references to the persons in addition to what is found in the following notes.

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LIST OF PERSONS COMPOSING THE CREW OF THE BRIG PILGRIM OF BOSTON, WHEREOF IS MASTER FRANCIS A. THOMPSON, BOUND FOR CALIFORNIA

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Note from MW: The above List will be added later

FROM OFFICIAL REGISTRY, MAY 5, 1825
The Brig Pilgrim "was built in the year 1825 at Medford, Mass., as appears by certificate of Sprague and James, master carpenters; under whose direction she was built"--"has 2 decks and 2 masts"--"her length is 86 feet and 6 inches, her breadth 21 feet 7 1/2 inches, her depth 10 feet 9 3/4 inches"--"and she measures one hundred and eighty tons and 56/95ths"--"has a figure head and a square stern; and no galleries."

"Joshua Blake of Boston, Mass."--"with Francis Stanton and George Hallet of Boston aforesaid are the only owners."

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LIST OF PERSONS COMPOSING THE CREW OF THE SHIP ALERT, OF BOSTON, WHEREOF IS MASTER E. H. FAUCON, BOUND FOR CALIFORNIA, 1834

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Note from MW: The above List will be added later

FROM THE OFFICIAL REGISTRY
The Alert "was built in the year 1828 at Boston"--"has two decks, and three masts and that her length is 113 feet 4 inches, her breadth twenty eight feet, her depth fourteen feet and that she measures Three hundred and ninety eight 18/95 tons,"--"has a billet head, and a square stern, no galleries." [The builder was Noah of Boston.]